crownedrose:

Today is so exciting for a ton of fellow palaeontologists, students, researchers, and myself… Dreadnoughtus has finally been published!

The video above gives you guys a bit of history to where this titanosaur was discovered back in 2005. Almost ten years later and it’s finally gone public! With a name like Dreadnoughtus, it’s hard not to want to run around saying its awesome name.

These fossils spent a lot of time being excavated out of the matrix they were found in; around 4 years with multiple labs working tirelessly to clean and repair them. We had to get it done at least in some sort of quick time, right? With such a huge specimen, a lot of man power is required!

I’m so proud and happy for everyone involved that we can now share this gorgeous dinosaur to the public! It’s MASSIVE. The fossils are just mind blowing to look at, and now we continue to move forward with its preservation, education, and further research. It’ll be going back to Argentina next year.

You can read the article about Dreadnoughtus here on Drexel University’s website, and the scientific paper on Nature.com (which some super awesome people I know worked on).

(via scinerds)

huffingtonpost:

This Is How Much The Female Portrait Has Evolved In The Last 500 Years

Art history books have a reputation of showcasing dead, white, European males — DWEM — and the (mostly white) women they handpicked as muses. Portrait after portrait reveals a woman’s face through a man’s gaze, casting a rather unsavory light on the tendency of artists to eroticize, objectify or idolize the female form.

See the full video for a striking look at the female portrait.

(Souce:  artFido)

scanzen:

Mapping the Milky Way. William Herschel’s galaxy maps (facsimile), 2009 (originals 1784–85). 

William Herschel and his sister Caroline made the first maps of the structure of our galaxy. For two years they surveyed thousands of stars, using their brightness to estimate distance from Earth.

Source: Science Museum - Courtesy of Royal Astronomical Society

(via freshphotons)

fromquarkstoquasars:

First Ever Image of Orion (left) & Most Advanced Image Ever (right):Want to see how much technology has advanced in 100 years?Look no further…We recently posted an image of the Orion nebula across all our social media sites. This image compared the first ever photograph of Orion (taken in 1880) with an image taken in 2013 on an iPhone.Most people seemed to enjoy the comparison. However, there was a bit of a kerfuffle. Some people asserted that, to be accurate and fair, we should compare the most detailed image pf Orion with Draper’s image from 1880. Your wish is our command…. First ever image of Orion by Henry Draper in 1880 (left) and most detailed image of Orion ever taken (right). Image compiled by From Quarks to QuasarsRead more about this story at:http://www.fromquarkstoquasars.com/?p=28189 High-res

fromquarkstoquasars:

First Ever Image of Orion (left) & Most Advanced Image Ever (right):

Want to see how much technology has advanced in 100 years?
Look no further…

We recently posted an image of the Orion nebula across all our social media sites. This image compared the first ever photograph of Orion (taken in 1880) with an image taken in 2013 on an iPhone.

Most people seemed to enjoy the comparison. However, there was a bit of a kerfuffle. 

Some people asserted that, to be accurate and fair, we should compare the most detailed image pf Orion with Draper’s image from 1880. Your wish is our command…. 

First ever image of Orion by Henry Draper in 1880 (left) and most detailed image of Orion ever taken (right). Image compiled by From Quarks to Quasars

Read more about this story at:
http://www.fromquarkstoquasars.com/?p=28189

fromquarkstoquasars:

Want to know how much technology has progressed in 100 years? 
Look no further…For comparison, see the most detailed image ever taken of Orion at:http://www.fromquarkstoquasars.com/apotd-glorious-image-of-orion/iPhone image via: Andrew SymesFind him at: https://twitter.com/FailedProtostar High-res

fromquarkstoquasars:

Want to know how much technology has progressed in 100 years?

Look no further…

For comparison, see the most detailed image ever taken of Orion at:http://www.fromquarkstoquasars.com/apotd-glorious-image-of-orion/

iPhone image via: Andrew Symes
Find him at: https://twitter.com/FailedProtostar